About Prediabetes

What is Prediabetes?

Having prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal—but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Prediabetes can often be reversed and underlying published research showed that completion of the program greatly reduced the risk for prediabetes developing into type 2 diabetes.

Eighty-six million Americans now have prediabetes—that’s one out of three adults! Of those Eighty-six million, nine out of ten of them don’t even know they have it.

Without intervention, many people with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes within five years. With numbers like that, it’s important to learn about prediabetes and take action.

What are Prediabetes and Diabetes?

Having prediabetes means blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal—but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Prediabetes can often be reversed.

With type 2 diabetes, the body cannot properly use insulin (a hormone that helps glucose get into the cells of the body). People can get type 2 diabetes at any age, but you are at higher risk if you are older, overweight, have a family history of diabetes, are not physically active, or are a woman who had gestational diabetes.

Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that some women get when they are pregnant. Even if a woman’s blood sugar levels go down after her baby is born, she is at higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes later in life.

To learn more about the basics of diabetes and prediabetes, visit CDC’s Diabetes website.

Who is at Risk?

People who have these risk factors may be at higher risk than others for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

  • 45 years of age or older.
  • Parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes.
  • Physically active fewer than 3 times per week.
  • Ever given birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds.
  • Ever had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes).
  • African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at unusually high risk for type 2 diabetes.

Find out if you are at risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Take this online quiz.

If you are at risk, talk to a health care professional about getting a blood sugar test and join the CDC National Diabetes Prevention Program.

The CDC National Diabetes Prevention Program Online

The Fruit Street Digital Diabetes Prevention Program delivers the CDC Diabetes National Prevention Program online through group telehealth sessions, wearable devices and dietary tracking in the Fruit Street mobile application. In addition to helping to lower the risk to develop type 2 diabetes, the program can also reduce your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, improve your health overall, and help you feel more energetic.

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